Pattern and Proportion: 6 Proportion Tips for a Better Fit

Awhile back, I was digging through an old tub and I found the first sewing pattern that I attempted as a 12 year old. It was the 90s and I wanted a grunge flannel. It turned out pretty bad...don't know how I thought a shirt would be the best idea for a first project, that’s some pretty advanced construction. I often tell my students about the results, that after I sewed my shirts, I was so bummed out that they just didn’t look as great as what I imagined. And they were often huge! Even though I had followed the measurement charts, and measured myself properly, I could not figure out why my pattern was so ill fitting.  As soon as I found this 1990's pattern, I knew I needed to sew it up from my current level of expertise and see what happens and see if I could make a better shirt. Here's a look at the pattern I found!

Choosing the right pattern, and making it work for your unique proportions is really important, so I’ve listed 6 tips to help you find the right proportions with a sewing pattern and included a free worksheet to help you record your own measurements and how they relate to proportion.

I know I'm not alone here, I receive emails all of the time that the main issue that sewists face as they grow in their skills is how to fit a commercial pattern. 

And its a process. I could never cover everything in one blog post, let alone even here on the blog- its so personal and nuanced to each person. But what I can do, is show you some of the process I have taken in steps, and how to analyze a pattern so that you have a better chance of success in your final sew.

Choosing the right pattern, and making it work for your unique proportions is really important. Today I want to share with you 6 tips to help you find the right proportions. And I have a worksheet that you will need to download to customize your own experience and use in your future patterns. There are some initial measurements and alterations that will help improve the proportion of your garment before you cut your fabric, and the worksheet is going to help you record your own. 

Understanding which proportions work best for you, has learning curve to it because you will have to try on garments, and think about how they make you feel. This post assumes that you already have an idea of a garment you would like to sew, and you are wanting to make work better for your individual proportions. Today I'm sharing pattern alterations I have tested and applied over the years from working with lots of clients, fit models, and my own garments. Here are a few steps that I take before cutting out my project that have helped me get successful proportions for clothing that looks and feels great.

I've also made you an important worksheet to download and print out for your pattern work. In my research of fit and working as a designer for many years and putting clothes on lots of people, I found that the 6 tips I share with you today were the common areas of complaint. You will want to get the worksheet and print it out so you can have it in your own sewing space to reference for your projects. 

Choosing the right pattern, and making it work for your unique proportions is really important, so I’ve listed 6 tips to help you find the right proportions with a sewing pattern and included a free worksheet to help you record your own measurements and how they relate to proportion.

Proportion Tip #1 Watch For Gathers and Added Fullness

Oversize proportions have been on trend, the last few years. You will see them especially with Japanese patterns, or more minimalist silhouttes. I also think its because more people are interested in sewing, and entering at the beginner level, so pattern companies are offering fuller garments that you can pull over your head because its a lot easier to sew a pattern that doesn't have a zipper, button holes, or plackets to contend with.

Unfortunately, in my personal experience, and the experience I have seen with many of my students, that while these types of patterns can seduce you because they are so quick and easy to sew, and appear so effortless to wear as modeled in the photo or sketch, a pattern without a lot of body definition tends completely hide the body. The extra fullness also adds weight, so theres that disappointment too. 

Its not that you can't sew them, but check the pattern and technical sketch- are there gathers, or pleats that lead to excessive fullness? You will want to sew up a muslin and see just how much. If it doesn't have a closure like a zipper, and its a pattern designed for woven, non stretch fabric, then the gathers are often an essential part of the design so you can actually get this garment over your body. But if you don’t want something to be too flouncy aka “Captain Hook,” I find myself cutting down the amount I gather.  For example, in my 90's shirt pattern, when I saw the amount of gathers in the cuff, I cut them down like this.

Folding a dart into the pattern will help decrease the amount of gathering at the cuff, and decrease excessive fullness in the sleeve.

Folding a dart into the pattern will help decrease the amount of gathering at the cuff, and decrease excessive fullness in the sleeve.

Proportion Tip #2: Determine the shoulder seam

Because its next to your face, and its at the top of the body, when I worked as an alterations tailor, I found that the shoulders of the garment were critical to getting your proportions right. If you think about it, your shoulders are the first place that the garment hangs, so you must get them right in order to have the bodice drape on the body in a flattering way.

You should know what your shoulder measurement is- go to the worksheet and make a note what yours is. Most women's shoulder lengths are between 4 and 5.5 inches. 

Back to my 90's pattern, this design is intentionally off the shoulder, and I will give this a go in the first sew up. But if my final result is not what I was hoping for,  then I will shorten the the seam like this (see below) to match my shoulder length. An average shoulder seam measurement is around 5 inches, so if its bigger than that, you will have to watch it because it may be out of proportion for your body and you will get lost in the garment.

This shirt's shoulder seam is long and drops off the shoulders. 

This shirt's shoulder seam is long and drops off the shoulders. 

Pinch a dart in the pattern at the shoulder seam to shorten it. 

Pinch a dart in the pattern at the shoulder seam to shorten it. 

Proportion Tip #3: Pay attention to the garment's details, like collars, cuffs, waistbands, and plackets

My husband Paul (@mr.seamster) taught me this- I was designing collars for him that were too big, and he always wanted to cut them down. Since this pattern is vintage 90s, the collar and collar stand are large, and large collars can really affect the proportion of your shirt and date your garment as well. What I do is measure center back width of the collar and carry that measurement all the way out to the top edge of the collar. You do have to keep your seam allowance in there, but this will slim out a collar and take out the big point. Now, this just happens to be a collar design I like, but you can choose to make the point look however you prefer. 

Big collars and big collar stands mean an oversize collar which isn't very contemporary. Decreasing their size can make these pieces much more flattering and more modern. 

Big collars and big collar stands mean an oversize collar which isn't very contemporary. Decreasing their size can make these pieces much more flattering and more modern. 

I also change the collar stand, but I start by measuring the end of it and cut a little bit out of the middle. Paul was the one who came up with this. He likes a narrow, refined stand and smaller collar so that his shirt proportions look more tailored and classic. 

Measure from the middle of the collar and extend it out to the end. This just happens to be a shape I like, but you can change the collar point to your unique preference. 

Measure from the middle of the collar and extend it out to the end. This just happens to be a shape I like, but you can change the collar point to your unique preference. 

Measure the end of your collar stand and cut down the middle to decrease how high your collar stands on the neck. 

Measure the end of your collar stand and cut down the middle to decrease how high your collar stands on the neck. 

Proportion Tip #4: Check your Lengths

Go to the worksheet, and now its time to look at all of the lengths of your pattern, the front, back, legs, and sleeves. To really get your proportions right, you are going to have to try on some clothes to know what looks best. But I can give you some tips that are helpful.

1. Make sure sleeve length and leg length are spot on. Your sleeves should end right in the middle between your wrist bone, and where your thumb begins. Any longer is going to force you to push up and roll up your sleeves, which effects the lines of the design and makes you look bigger than you are. I've seen a lot of designers have the consensus that if a pant length is the right length, then there will be no "breaks" or folds in the hang of the pant. Now I know this is personal, so do what's best for you, but avoid fabric pooling at the ankles in order to get a flattering look.

2. Shirts tend to look best when untucked if they hit right between the natural waist and the hips. This doesn't always apply, obviously if its designed to be in a certain place there's always that nuance, but if you are making most shirts that's a good place for most people.

3. Check the skirt length. I have had a lot of my shorter and petite clients prefer a right at the knee, or above the knee final hem because anything longer tended to over whelm the body. Other wise, they preferred to wear a full length skirt. Obviously its a personal taste preference, but a good rule of thumb to follow with skirt length is to know that its going to call attention to whatever part of your legs that the hem hits. If you love your calves and want to show them off, then a longer skirt might work great.  

Proportion Tip #5: Watch the fullness of your Sleeves

I go way more in-depth on this topic in a later post, but as I showed above, the fullness of your sleeve is really important. But its not just about eliminating too much gathering. When I did alterations, one of the most common alterations I did all of the time is the slimming of the sleeves. You can go to this post to check it out and the reason its so important is that it really slims your body, and emphasizes your unique proportions when you don't have excess fabric in between the waist and the arm.

Proportion Tip #6: Honor your waistline

I know, its a sensitive place on the body and sometimes the last place we want to call attention too. And I'm not talking about creating wasp waists by any means, but a lot of the time, even when you feel like your body is out of shape or out of proportion, by just nipping the sides, or adding back darts at the natural waist, you can make your garment a lot more flattering. I know not all styles call for it, but even those with large amounts of waistline ease look good with a slight nip to the waist, to create the hint of a bend. You might try it! It really helps garments flatter more figures regardless of size and shape.

I hope this was helpful. Remember to get your worksheet so that you can use this for your future patterns. 

I know proportion is a huge topic, and altering your patterns is another huge topic, but these are just a few things to look as soon as you cut out your pattern and prepare it for cutting the cloth. There are so many levels of pattern alterations and how you can make your clothing fit better. If you are just getting started working with commercial patterns, I recommend my Basic Patterns Online Class. It covers exactly how I work with commercial garment patterns, and I include more tips on proportion and measurement to help you get a successful result. Please go check it out :

Thanks for reading! Tell me some of your favorite proportion alts in the comments, I'm always learning :)